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I’m Jacob Cass, the founder of JUST™ Creative. I’m a multi-disciplinary graphic designer, working with clients all around the world. My specialty is logo & brand identity design. JUST™ Get in touch.

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Top 10 E-mail Etiquette Tips During Your Career Search

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This article has been contributed by Jeffrey.

Currently, for the past several years, email communication has proven an effective solution for many purposes. It saves money, time and allows you to find what you want without intermediaries.

For this reason, having the company data to which you wish to apply for a job can be very useful. This may help you get a job in no time.

Email Etiquette

There are still many people who believe that it is preferable to deliver their curriculum in person because they think that email is not an effective channel. Social networks are proving to be one of the most effective channels ever. However, according to HR professionals at SolidEssay.com, which is a college paper writing company, this channel will be effective if you consider the below tips and etiquette hints when sending your applications:

1. Review your resume.

It should be adapted to the company in question. Keep it simple and concise. Here are some examples of what not to do when sending email.

2. Never send the same email to several companies simultaneously.

Companies should feel unique; you must show that you are opting for various jobs. Never send the same email with a copy to various companies. If you are forwarding the same one, at least try to erase the matter field “Fwd:” showing that the mail is being forwarded.

3. Customize the subject field for each of your emails.

In the subject field, you must refer to the position you are responding to. Refer to the offer that the company has published. In that case, include the issue that the company has indicated in that specific ad.

4. If it is a self-candidacy do it spontaneously.

Indicate what you are sending, i.e. name in your resume and your professional range, indicating, for example: John Smith resume, Content Manager. In this way, you will clearly state what you are sending and you can arouse the interest of the person who receives it.

5. The subject field is very important.

You must keep in mind that companies receive many emails every day. Thereby, you should try to make things easier for the person who will receive it, so he or she knows what you’re sending.

Times Square

6. Customize your mail.

If possible, send an e-mail to the person who directly deals with the personnel selection. It is not enough to get the general direction of the company data. Instead, try to direct the mail to the person who usually makes personnel decisions, like human resource managers. A good way to find them is to make use of LinkedIn.

7. Include your resume as an attachment.

It is preferable that you deliver it in PDF format so that it cannot be modified and there is no mismatch when opening from other computers. There are programs that can convert PDF files for free.

8. Include a cover letter in the body of the message.

When the person opens the mail, he or she should be able to find your letter perfectly written and directed. This letter must include data that stand out and fit the position or employment. The purpose of this letter is to introduce yourself and get the recruiter’s attention. Include past job experiences, values, special skills, etc.

9. Sign the letter and include your contact details.

A high percentage of recruiters are seeking for candidates’ information on the Internet and social networks. If you want to show who you are and who knows you professionally, you have to be on social networks and allow the person to make the decision to further expand the available information.

10. Use an adequate e-mail address.

You may have a friendly and fun email address, but in this case, you must show seriousness. All details count.

All in all, e-mail etiquette matters a lot. It is recommended that you start in advance. Do not forget that e-mail is a major source of spam and you must try to escape from these filters and get them to read you!

Do you have any more email etiquette tips to add?

Jeffrey is a freelance writer writing on topics related to online education and at the same time provides essay writing tips for students. He works for various educational establishments, including SolidEssay.com. Check out his recent publication on how to write an outline in APA format.


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19 JUST™ Creative Comments

  • Sasha Endoh Reply

    Great post Jeffrey! I wanted to add a tiny detail. Around the end of academic semesters at local universities I get lots of email requests for work and internships. You touched on this in the “Customize your mail” section but I just wanted to reiterate the point, even though it may seem like a no brainer. Don’t just send your e-mail to the right person, but also address it to that person! I get the “Dear Sir or Madam” opening even though my name in my email address (and I’m a freelancer with my name in my company name). When I see that opening line I don’t bother looking at anything beyond it. Showing that you’ve done your homework is a great boon, the opposite is a definite detriment.

    Thanks for a great article!

    • Jacob Cass Reply

      Sasha,
      Same with me! I get so many Dear Sir or Madam!

      • Sasha Endoh Reply

        Ooops, Jacob! I wasn’t sure who’d be replying to comments so figured I’d address my original comment to the post author. Talk about addressing things properly ;)

        I remember back in high school the “Dear sir or madam” line seemed like the most official one, even like the most respectful way to address a letter. I wonder if people using this opening line are doing it out of respect or even out of assumption that you might have an assistant read your emails.

        • Jacob Cass Reply

          You can address both, I read all comments on my blog so I reply when I can. Yeah I know the Dear Sir or Madam is what was taught, but I think that’s when you don’t know who you’re wanting to speak with.

  • Steve Reply

    Hello Jacob,

    I have a question. When you are sending a pdf portfolio to an e-mail for a possible job, what is the safest pdf file size to send? I know that the smaller the size the better it is, but what could be considered the maximum safest size limit? Also, is it a good idea to add a sample design page to your resume? (First page the resume, second page your samples).

    Thanks in advance, and thanks for always sharing helpful articles!

    Steve

  • Jacob Cass Reply

    Hi Steve,

    I would keep it under 10mb, even under 5mb if you can. I would keep the portfolio and resume separate. Thanks!

    • Steve Reply

      Thank you for your answer, Jacob! I appreciate the reply.

      • Eóin Reply

        Hi Steve,

        Another option is to have it as a downloadable file. I know some companies (not so much in the design industry) have very small file limits on incoming emails. I have always found having a link to your portfolio/resume can be really useful, it can also be a great way of directing them to your site if you have one.

        Also, I always get the Sir/Madam mails too and how much they would love to work for my company, one look at my site and you know I am a freelancer. It’s the little things! :)

        Best,
        Eóin

  • Sophia Moran Reply

    Thanks so much for writing this article! I’m a second semester senior graduating from business school and trying to get into the creative/branding/graphic/marketing field… while Tulane University has given me a great job searching background, it’s also interesting hearing it from someone who’s an expert in the industry I’m trying to enter. No Dear Sir or Madams ever!

    Sophia Moran
    A.B. Freeman School of Business

  • Leonard Reply

    As a manager of 70+ folks over the course of 20+ years, I think your tips are right on target. The only thing I would add is that sometimes you are allowed to be yourself somewhat in a cover letter/email. Providing a little hint of personality, while remaining professional, is often a good sign that the person is confident in themselves and often is a ‘go getter’. This may not be the best strategy for your first job, but if you are moving up the ladder, what is going to separate you from the pile of corporate speak everyone else is throwing down?

    • Jacob Cass Reply

      That’s a great tip regarding being yourself in the cover letter, it allows you to show your personality a little bit. Having it well designed will also help in our industry of course.

  • Saqib Ahmed Reply

    Well that is very nice article. Being a business student I know the importance of online job applying. The tips you have mentioned above will surely help for many.

  • Rahul Gupta Reply

    Thanks for sharing this article. Great tips for applying job online and surely useful for the carrier orientated guys.

  • Ankur Reply

    That is an incredible tip in regards to being yourself in the presentation document, it permits you to show your identity a smidgen. Having it overall outlined will likewise help in our industry obviously.

  • Josh Reply

    I currently put a link in my Signature to my Online Portfolio for both Graphic Design & Photography, I also Attach some of my best work or Dropbox download link, good or bad idea?


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