[Podcast] Strategic Audio Branding with Drop Music Branding

[Podcast] Strategic Audio Branding with Drop Music Branding

Just Creative is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. Learn more

Ever heard of sonic branding?

Sonic branding, otherwise known as audio branding, is the strategic use of music and sound to help reinforce brand recognition and enhance the consumer experience.

We go deep in this session, exploring the ins and outs of successful audio branding, using popular examples, as well as the process Drop Music Branding used to audio brand this very podcast.

Tune in to the JUST Branding Podcast with Jacob Cass, Matt Davies & Gabriel Ignacio Agüero to discover why “good audio branding is invisible” and how you can stand out with audio branding.

Listen Here

Love the show? Please review us on Apple or Stitcher.

 

Play Now

 

Watch on Youtube

sponsored message

Adobe Creative Cloud Discount

.

Show Notes

Drop Music Branding is an audio branding agency based in Argentina. Today we speak with Gabriel Ignacio Agüero about how to strategically use audio branding to stand out in the market.

Resources:

 

Learn Brand Strategy

sponsored message


Best Brand Strategy Course Online

Brand Master Secrets helps you become a brand strategist and earn specialist fees. And in my opinion, this is the most comprehensive brand strategy course on the market.

The course gave me all the techniques and processes and more importantly… all the systems and tools I needed to build brand strategies for my clients.

I literally watched every video front-to-back and learned something new in pretty much every module (and that’s coming from someone who has been in branding for 15 years!).

This is the consolidated “fast-track” version to becoming a brand strategist.

I wholeheartedly endorse this course for any designer who wants to become a brand strategist and earn specialist fees.

Check out the 15-minute video about the course, which lays out exactly what you get in the Brand Master Secrets.

 

Show Transcript

Jacob Cass:
Hello, and welcome to Episode Nine of Just Branding. I’m super excited today because we’re going to be talking about audio branding, and it’s a topic that is not talked about very often, especially in the branding world. People may be aware of what an audio logo is, but maybe not the breadth of how deep audio branding goes. And today, we have Gabriel Agüero from Drop Music Branding and they’re a super talented bunch, there’s three of them down in Argentina. I recently worked with them to create the intro for Just… Well, this podcast, actually. You heard it when you tuned in. And, they didn’t just create that, but they created a whole suite of sounds to create this show.

Jacob Cass:
We’re going to go through them today. We’re going to share that with Gabe-O… Gabba? Gabbo? I’ve practiced his name so many times, and I still mess it up. Gabe-O, Gabriel. We’re going to go… talk through some of the sounds he created for us. They’re awesome. And, we’re going to talk about what audio-branding is, some examples of it from other brands. We’re going to talk about when it’s required. How you can apply it, the benefits of it, what makes good and what’s bad audio branding, and how we can actually sell through audio branding to a client who may not be aware of what it is. We’re going to talk about the process and how we can stand out as designers or brands in the market place. We may even touch on trademarking, as well. So, we’ve got a lot to cover. Super-excited to talk about this with Gabe-O and Matt as well, who is here in the background calling from the U.K. I’m from Australia, so we are pretty much the furthest away possible that we can be. But, we’re making this happen and I’m super-excited to get into this.

Matt Davies:
A global podcast. Who would have thought?

Jacob Cass:
Exactly, exactly.

sponsored message


Matt Davies:
All corners of the globe.

Jacob Cass:
So, let’s start at the top. Audio-branding. What is it to you, Gabe-O?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Hey, guys. First of all, I want to thank you guys for having me on the show. I’m really honored to be here. Well, audio-branding. Audio-branding branches from branding, of course. It’s like obviously branching from branding, but if you were a musician and you learned and you kind of came to… across audio-branding, you’d have to learn a lot of branding, so that’s kind of different from us. And, if you are a brander and you come across with audio-branding, you kind of have to understand how music works.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
I would say that audio-branding is the way… the design of brands’ communication through sound. That’s the definition… I think it’s more useful. It’s not just… Maybe you guys can relate to this, it’s not just, “Make it prettier, make it sound good.” It’s like you have to make audio assets for a brand that supports that brand’s identity. They communicate what the brand can… wants to communicate. It’s not as easy as doing something you would like to hear, or listen.

Jacob Cass:
Great. To give some perspective here, can you give some examples of… I guess some famous audio brands, or logos, or any sounds that you have hiding up your sleeve?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Oh, yeah. Of course, Jacob. I’m going to do a little bit of acting right now. Say we are… We bought a machine that promises… that is going to make us the best professional we can. So, we get home and we start the machine and we hear this. So, who can tell me, what brand am I talking about?

Jacob Cass:
All the fanboys out there just…

Matt Davies:
Definitely… No… Apple.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay, okay. [crosstalk 00:04:45]

Matt Davies:
I was going to say something else just to see how you’d respond, but I thought that would be… That would be a real jerk thing to do, so I’ll… [crosstalk 00:04:56]

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay, so…

Matt Davies:
Definitely Apple. That’s brilliant. It’s so recognizable, isn’t it?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yes. Yes, it is. So, picture this. After a hard day’s job, you reach home, you’re going to see a movie, and you hear this one.

Jacob Cass:
Netflix and chill.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Netflix and chill, indeed. Or, you can hear this one as well, if the White Walkers are going to get you.

Jacob Cass:
Game of Thrones, there you go. So, that’s some very strong little clips of sound that really are very identifiable. So, this is what I hired Drop Music Branding to do for our show. We created an audio logo, and we also created the intro, and we also created a background loop that goes behind our audio and a sound cue that kind of is… that we use between transitions. And also an outro, which is what we use at the end of the podcast when things are closing out. There’s a lot of different sounds and we’re going to dive into each of those. Would you be able to share some of those that I just mentioned?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yes, of course. Of course. For this project, we kind of leaned on my experience as a T.V. producer. I’ve done this for many years. So, I understood that the podcast needed to have some sections, some structure to the show, right? So, of course, this is the intro.

Matt Davies:
That’s class, all right.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yeah, thanks. Yeah, definitely. Really happy with how it ended up. So, the intro ends with the audio logo, because it’s… the audio logo, it’s like the mini-hit of the brand. It’s the brand’s signature. You need, as a strategy… This, I was thinking about all the week to say here in the show… audio-branding has a strategy that involves every asset of the brand. Every audio asset, as well as… Graphic design has it’s kind of strategy, and every brand needs a strategy. We need to repeat our audio assets as many times as we… is possible, because that’s how our brain processes the… I’m sorry, the main goal of audio-branding is to link an emotion with the brand. Make it an experience. Make the brand experience. So, our brain links sound directly to emotions. This is because of how we evolved as human beings. If you are making an awesome product, and you’re making an awesome experience, you need to have audio-branding that reflects that so that every… so the audience, whenever listens to that sound, it says, “Okay, it’s Netflix. Okay, it’s H.B.O. I’m starting my Mac,” you know? So, the strategy is repetition.

Matt Davies:
I think you’re absolutely-

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
This [crosstalk 00:09:07] Yeah.

Matt Davies:
Sorry. Go on.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
No, no.

Matt Davies:
Go on. You go, Gabe-O.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
This is the audio logo of Just Branding. So, you guys need to repeat that as many times as you can so audience will… whenever they hear this, they say, “Okay, it’s Matt and Jacob. This brand’s strategy… this is Just Branding.” And that’s it.

Matt Davies:
Gabe-O, that’s brilliant. I think the other bit that I probably would add to the mix is… From my perspective…. because basically the way the project panned out was that Jacob engaged with you guys-

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Oh, sorry.

Matt Davies:
That’s okay. We’ll come back to that one. The way the project panned out was… because Jacob basically engaged you and I didn’t want to muddy the waters too much, but Jacob was keeping me updated all the way through. We were sort of talking like, “Well, what kind of sound do we want? What kind of brand do we want to create for our podcast?” The idea of… having this idea of momentum and hopefully having a bit… being kind of cool, however you define that, and being edgy and a little bit modern, and also having something that was quite upbeat and reflected our personalities, basically was kind of the brief that we were sort of dancing around ourselves. Then, for that to go over to you and be able to create that, we think… Obviously, it’s fantastic, and it really represents where we wanted to go from a strategic perspective in sound and, as you say, connecting that to the human emotion behind it, that’s a real skill.

Matt Davies:
I’d be really interested to hear, how did you think, “Well, this is the type of feel that these guys want,” and how did you translate that to sound? For me, as kind of an ex-designer and a strategist, that’s a massive talent. You pretty much hit it off the bat with us. Have you got any thoughts on how you actually got those bits out of our brief and were able to create some sounds which really resonated with us?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay, Matt. Before I answer that, I have to say, you are making me blush. Thank you so much.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Actually, that was a good brief. It’s hip and kind of cool, and I saw how you guys look and talk and kind of… the show is about strategy, and we… I asked you a little bit about what makes… what would make this show unique? We kind of… I have two very talented partners, as well, I have to say that. Dalmiro and Mauro, they are amazing artists. They are always listening to the last thing, what is happening this month, this day, last week in the music industry. So, that’s a big thing to do. Always researching. We needed to do something that… it was interesting, that it would catch people’s attention. And, at the same time, it had to have some kind of seriousness to the show. It’s not like… it’s a show about brand strategy, it’s not like a comedy show. Right?

Matt Davies:
No.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
That kind of makes everything [crosstalk 00:13:03]

Matt Davies:
Although, we do laugh from time to time. I’d say we do have a bit of a chuckle-

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yeah, yeah. [crosstalk 00:13:06] I’m not saying that it’s going to be like… Well, that’s different. If you’re saying, “We’re going to talk about global hunger,” I won’t do something very happy. So, that’s kind of the approach we had. It was kind of free at some points because we find ourselves having to educate a lot of our clients. In this case, you were our client, and I had to do a little bit of investigation about what would this podcast… why would this podcast would be different and unique? I think it matches with both of you guys. I think it does.

Jacob Cass:
Yeah, for sure. I think another thing that helped along the process was providing some examples of different references so you had something to go off and obviously it helps…

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yeah, definitely.

Jacob Cass:
Then you came back to us with a few different options and we’re like, “Oh, this one’s great. Maybe just not that one,” and then kind of just refined that. Then, from that core sound, you created the rest of the sounds. I think that’s the perfect cue into the other sound bytes that were curated. We’ve heard the intro, we’ve heard the audio logo, which I’d love for you to play just once more, and then we’ll go into I guess the sound cue, which is like a one-second clip. Then, perhaps the loop. Then, the outro.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay. Okay.

Matt Davies:
Gabe-O, you have told us to play this as much as possible, so let’s have it again.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay, okay. I’m just going to play it once more so people don’t hate me… start hating me. But, Jacob said something that is very important. We kind of… without knowing to do it, we developed a methodology for audio-branding, because audio-branding is not… It’s not new, but there is not many books about it. So, we kind of had to… I read everything and still have to understand how to do it and develop my own methodology. What I understood was two things. Two main things. I was always going to deal with designers who develop their profession to branding. And, I needed to start from a center piece to create the rest of the brand sound universe. So, what we always do is start with the main thing, that is the audio logo. Here is the Just Branding audio logo.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Once we did that, we came up with the intro. Then, we did the sound cue that is mainly for short transitions as an effect. That is like a shorter version of the audio logo. And then… Oh, the branded loop. Yeah, the branded loop is… I know you asked, it’s used for giving rhythm to the dialogue. When you’re introducing someone or you’re maybe talking about something that is a little bit looser than when they… the guest is saying something really important, you can play it in the background. If you play it really low, it has good rhythm and you’re still on-brand. That’s kind of the main goal for this asset.

Jacob Cass:
This is my personal favorite. It’s very funky.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yeah. It’s kind of like the intro, but with less density of instruments and kind of gives… The main goal is to give rhythm to the speech.

Jacob Cass:
What you don’t see here is us head-nodding along.

Matt Davies:
We’re banging.

Jacob Cass:
And Gabe-O is, yeah… head-banging.

Matt Davies:
Can I just come in here just one second, Gabe-O, and just ask you a quick question just before you go onto the outro? You know within that clip there’s a distorted voice that says, “Just Branding,” which I absolutely love, right?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yeah.

Matt Davies:
The other thing is that I know in our intro we’ve got kind of a voice intro as well. So, I have a little question for you. How do you… how sort of powerful do you think the human voice is in sort of complimenting these audio brands? Would you put that within this idea of audio-branding? Would it be a great idea for brands, for example, to think about how they sound and to almost think about having a voiceover artist or a few voiceover artists that… they could become their brand ambassadors or brand voices, if you like? What do you think about those sorts of ideas?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Absolutely, Matt. It’s absolutely necessary for every brand to have a voice, definitely. I think that… that’s why… although we are called Drop Music Branding, that was like kind of a lucky accident. We always say that we do audio-branding. It’s not just music branding. Music is a part of it, but having a brand voice is absolutely necessary for every brand because it gives the brand personality and humanity. It makes the brand more relatable. Yeah.

Matt Davies:
Now, I think that’s fantastic. You see, one of the things I do a lot in my work, and I’m sure Jacob does in his, is you almost have to take clients and you have to kind of explain to them that really, consumers, they almost see brands like they see a person. It dresses a certain way, and it’s graphic design, and it’s visual language, and it’s photography. It speaks a certain way in its tone of voice and how it writes, but also becoming more increasingly… particularly with Alexa and voice and even ads on T.V. and so on… obviously it speaks a certain way, literally, in the actual voice it has. I certainly see this as a huge area of branding which, as strategists, we’re going to have to get to grips with. But, it’s kind of alien for those of us that have come from a design background. We’re used to plunking something on a page and being able to manipulate that, but this is so much more… so much different… so different to that. I’m really fascinated by that as branding evolves into the future. How do you see it evolving into the future, Gabe-O? Have you got any thoughts on that?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
I’m sorry. I’m going to answer the one before… That of course, it’s like a person. A brand is like a person. It has its personality and that’s the second thing I realized back then, that I can’t fight with the topic that… Every brand… When I… I’m sorry. When I talk to my direct client, they always say, “Okay. We need to develop more our graphic branding and then go to audio-branding.” And, that’s okay. I don’t have to fight that. So, I’m always going to have people like you, Matt, saying, “I’m a graphic designer who develops strategy,” and I find, yes of course, I have to get in line with you and understand that if a brand is a… clients have to see like a personality, as a person. You have to dress it. You have to think about your target audience. You have to think how it sounds. How it speaks. What’s its voice? We’re always saying about the tone of the brand. How do we speak to our audience? Well, this is… We know what we are going to speak, this is how we are going to speak. Is it a female voice? Is it a male voice? Those are big things to have in mind, and about where it’s going.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
I think technology is going a lot to non-interface products such as contact lists, create curds, and, as you say, Alexa and that kind of product where sound is very important. I think that sound is very important for a user interface through interaction feedback. I think that’s going to be big. And, I think that eventually sound… if well done, obviously, and well-designed sound, audio-branding, it improves. I definitely think that.

Jacob Cass:
I agree. And, you just touched on something there about… at the moment we’re actually going through a show such as ours, but there’s so many other audio-branding examples we can use. One example that came to mind was Nintendo, because they have a very fun nature about them. When you interact with their games and just send a message or anything, it has that fun feel to it. So, when you talk about tone of voice and how that… having a character, that’s the perfect example that came to my mind of what you were just saying, then.

Jacob Cass:
On that topic, I was going to ask, how can you distinguish a good… good audio-branding from bad audio-branding? I know there’s a lot of stock options out there. It’s probably your most-hated word, but maybe you use that, maybe you don’t. I’m curious to your insights of good, bad, and stock.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
You… Okay, thanks. That’s a very interesting question. I think that the example you made from… you gave from Nintendo is exactly perfect for this question. The audio-branding has to represent the brand, support the brand and the values and what the brand wants to communicate. If Nintendo is a very fun brand, and you know Mario and all that… Every little sound has to support that.

Matt Davies:
How did that go? Just do that again? That was brilliant.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yay, woo! You like to make fun of me.

Matt Davies:
See, I told you we have a laugh on this show. We have a laugh on this. No, you’re absolutely right. Keep going, sorry. I-

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Suddenly I’m Mario. What I’m saying is every bit… every audio touchpoint… every audible touchpoint has to support the brand’s personality. You have to be consistent. You love that word. We, too, need to have… we need to be consistent in every touchpoint. It builds trust.

Jacob Cass:
Well said. Yeah, consistency does build trust. I can see how much relation is… I guess branding is just like… this big thing, but it… consistency and alignment between all of these things is what we’re going for here. So, I think you summarized that quite well. Gabe-O, how can we communicate audio-branding and its value to a client who may not know what audio-branding is or how valuable it can be to a brand?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay. I think… As I said before, I think that first, because of every client and what we… we’re built to know, every client will want to have first its graphic logo and the color palate and all the graphic branding. But, once they have that, I think that in today’s world every brand has it. They are going to want to start having videos and communicating through social media. There’s a big audible touchpoint there. You have to make the client understand that you can’t leave it at chance. You can’t take any music, because… it’s kind of hard because everybody has an opinion on music. We all love music, and we all listen to music, and everybody thinks that they have the greatest taste. And, I like hip music, so I know what this is going to do. I think that the most valuable thing you can say about audio-branding is that it connects with the audience at the emotional level, and that’s very important to create a brand experience. I think that’s the way… that’s the path.

Jacob Cass:
Sure. You said touchpoints. What are some touchpoints that the most… Let’s say a small business or even a startup could use? What are the main touchpoints?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay. I think that social media is the main touchpoint to nowadays, because everybody is using them. It’s kind of the way you communicate to the world as a brand. It could also be advertising. There, you need to use audio as well. And, well, today… nowadays, podcasting is going to be big. So, there’s a big touchpoint there. For big brands… It depends on the brand, mainly, but for big brands, I.V.R. is an audible touchpoint as well. Events… Well, events are a big touchpoint as well because there you can… we’ve been doing big projects for big brands, they ask us to do a brand song where they… if they have a stand or some big event where brands go… I can’t say the word in English… Conventions.

Jacob Cass:
Ah, yes.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Big conventions where you have to stand out from your competition? Well, then you have your brand song in loop and your audio logo everywhere. You’ve got to try to connect with the audience with every possible tool.

Matt Davies:
That’s amazing. Like at a conference or a big event or something, you would have your audio-branding. And, I suppose if you had any members of your organization who were going to get up to speak or something, you might then play the audio-branding to kind of introduce them and stuff like that. Then it kind of really grows, doesn’t it, I guess, as a concept. As a marker. As an identifier.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yes. Yeah. Totally. You have to try to create that sound universe throughout every little chance you have to… Salesmen have the ringtone of the brand. If you’re… they are in a sale, they, “Oh. Okay…” Maybe I’m going to do a little example…

Jacob Cass:
I’m going to change my ringtone to the Just Branding logo.

Matt Davies:
Yeah, me too. Let me just… Let’s just pause everything there. Whoa.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Oh, sorry. My phone is ringing. [crosstalk 00:31:07] Well, you know, it’s relatable.

Matt Davies:
Yeah.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
And recognizable.

Jacob Cass:
I think that… Earlier, before we started recording, you said something that was very relatable here. Good audio-branding is invisible. So, what do you mean by that?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yeah. I mean… Well, you ask me, “how can you differentiate from a good audio-branding from a bad audio-branding?” The interdisciplinary… it’s invisible because it’s done for an… it’s a means to an end. You have to solve things through design. Well designed… well-done design is invisible, because people doesn’t even notice that there’s a strategy, there’s a plan, somebody studied how the interface would be better for the user. I think good audio-branding reflects the personality of the brand in such a way that anybody doesn’t… they don’t notice it. For example, when Apple introduced the iPhone X, I think, they played the video of every product and all this history of Apple products. In the video, they would play the… some characteristic sound of their products. So, when you shut your MacBook, that sound, it’s amazing. It’s not just sound for video. It’s snacks. French fries. How many french fries make their brand crunch? It’s like they’re based on their audio-branding and you don’t even realize. That’s good audio-branding.

Jacob Cass:
Yeah.

Matt Davies:
Yeah, it’s very powerful.

Jacob Cass:
When you open a Coke, there’s that sound. When you shut a B.M.W. door, there’s a certain sound.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Of course.

Jacob Cass:
It’s [crosstalk 00:33:38]

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
There are people that… there is a big people of team studying how the sound would be better if they do a click or it’s a… it’s amazing, the sound design.

Jacob Cass:
Coca-Cola sells happiness, not sugar in a bottle. Or, that’s what they’re trying to tell us, anyway. But, that opening sound is what they’re trying to relate to happiness. So, open happiness, it ties in with their whole brand [crosstalk 00:34:11].

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Yeah, and the, “Aah.” Finally, “Aah.” It’s like, “Oh, now I’m happy.” It’s amazing. They pull it.

Jacob Cass:
Yeah, they do it well. There’s one more question on… Totally unrelated to this, but trademarking. It’s a very important aspect of audio-branding. I guess it’s the next step-

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
It’s very important, yeah.

Jacob Cass:
The next step-

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
It’s a very important thing because… Yes, it’s a big thing. You have to… when you decide to involve in audio-branding, you have to know some certain aspects. I would think… I think that a brand needs to buy the copyrights of the audio-branding because it… it would be useless if they have to pay every time they use it. It’s kind of the main thing about having your own original audio-branding. It’s your sound. It’s like co-creating of a logo. You have to assure your brand that it’s the only brand that is going to use that… For big…

Jacob Cass:
Can I just ask… When you’re saying that, are you talking about when you buy audio-branding you ensure that you own rights to it and you’re not paying royalties on it. Is that what you’re referring to?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
It’s not that you’re not paying royalties. You actually are paying royalties, but you are paying them to yourself because you own the copyright. I think that… For example, we are talking about big brands. Whenever we work with small brands or entrepreneurs, that’s not an issue because the copyrights that it generates, they are not big. So, we…

Jacob Cass:
I got you.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
We give it to them. It’s not that important. But when you have to make a national advertisement, there is a lot of money involved. There’s a very big industry in music and that fits around that. You need to buy your copyrights so that you pay the royalties, but you pay it to yourself. There’s a system, there’s certain organizations that keep track of what’s being used in T.V. and where there’s… There’s a big issue about YouTube and the internet, about that, because open source and royalties are not friends.

Jacob Cass:
Yes.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
But, they’re getting it. So, I think that it’s important for big brands to buy the royalties. If you’re entrepreneur or a small brand, I would talk about it and wouldn’t think that if you have your original audio-branding, I don’t think you will have any problem about it.

Jacob Cass:
I was going to ask before… I think we should start to summarize. I wanted to give a big shout-out to you, say thank-you for all your hard work with branding Just Branding. It was just incredible, really. I just wanted to give this opportunity to you to talk about the benefits of audio-branding. So, if you were trying to sell this through to someone, how would you sell the benefits of audio-branding? Obviously, who should they go to for it?

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay. Thanks. Thanks to you, Jacob. Really, it’s been… I feel little bit of… like a… the Cinderella story about this because I… since 2020 started, I started talking to people and putting myself out there and taking my chances and getting out of my comfort zone of being… doing business here in Argentina. It’s been really quite a journey. It’s amazing. I’ve been having this amazing feedback and interactions, getting to know people like yourself. That’s awesome. I… This is the best thing globalization has done for me. I’m getting to know people that I can relate to and good persons. Thanks to you, man.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Okay. Benefits. Awareness is a pretty big benefit of audio-branding. It’s… People start to understand and recognize your sound. That’s a big one. Differentiation. You’re making yourself unique and differentiating from the competition. Memorability. You… people start… reminding your sounds and the way your brand sounds. Kind of you are starting to build your personality and, again, being unique. This builds trust, definitely. Builds trust, and you start to generate an ecosystem that people start to feel belonging to. You… People start to… the audience starts to become fond of the brand, and that’s a main benefit of audio-branding because, as I said before, how our brain processes sound, it links it to emotions. So, when you start being consistent with your sounds that reflect your brand’s personality and you start to… generating a fan club. It becomes an experience. As I said before, it improves… Well, I think there are a lot of benefits.

Jacob Cass:
There are a lot of benefits. You summarized them well. We’ve seen the benefits ourselves. Thank you for that summary. I’m not sure if you had anything else to add, Matt.

Matt Davies:
No, I just wanted to thank Gabe-O for coming on, as well, the show. It’s one thing to do a great job with our branding, but then to give up his time to come on and to talk to the listeners about it is another thing altogether. Thanks for coming on. I absolutely love your humility with all of this stuff. I think you’re fantastic. I would definitely say if anyone’s out there thinking, “Well, we could do with some of that.” Reach out to Gabe-O. I’m sure he’d be more than happy to kind of give you some tips and some pointers and maybe work with you. Thank you so much for your professionalism and for coming on and for your energy. It’s been great.

Jacob Cass:
Thank you.

Gabriel Ignacio Agüero:
Wow. Thanks, Matt. I love you two guys, and thanks for having me. Well, if you want to reach out to me, it’s Drop Music Branding dot com, and here we are.

Jacob Cass:
Cool. Thank you. And, I just want to touch on what you said earlier about putting yourself out there. I actually came across you on LinkedIn, because you left a comment on one of my posts and I just checked out your profile, and that’s really how the relationship started. By putting yourself out there, you got found, and here we are. You never know where things will take you. I’ll leave on that note. Thank you again, and we’ll see you next episode.

[Cyber Monday Deals LIVE!]
[Cyber Monday Deals LIVE!]